May 2017 Faculty Accomplishments

Heather Acomb, Visiting Assistant Professor of Dance, completed a week-long residency at South Dakota State University, serving as creative consultant and dancer for phase one of the William (Bill) Evans Legacy Project. 

Marian Brown, Director for the Center for Sustainability and the Environment,organized and was a faculty expert during the Finger Lakes Project sustainability curriculum development workshop, held on campus on May 25-26. More than two dozen K-12 and collegiate faculty from around the state attended to learn how to infuse sustainability content into curricula across disciplines. Brown presented “Education for Sustainability – what counts?”, “Teaching Pedagogies”, and explained the Sustainability Literacy Assessment used by some Wells sustainability courses. 

Heather R. Buechler (H.R. Buechler), Victor Hammer Fellow, organized and moderated Session 1: Towards a New Ideology of (Print) Production—a roundtable discussion in collaboration with OXBLOOD Publishing, featuring Will Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, England), David Armes (Red Plate Press, Yorkshire, England) & Tate Shaw (Visual Studies Workshop, Rochester, NY). Held on April 21, 2017, with support from the Wells Book Arts Center and Wells College, it is the first session in an iterative series; part of Buechler’s ongoing research in contemporary publication practices. The abstract for the first session is as follows:

Launched in late 2016, "Towards a New Ideology of (Print) Production" utilizes the democratic platform of the independent press to engage in a rigorous cross-disciplinary collaborative process to generate a manifesto for production in the 21st Century. How do we define “production”? What is the function of the “press” and who does it serve? How do we think and produce critically, with intention, while honoring content and a cultural urgency to disseminate? Engaging across disciplines is a vital action for generating relevant (art) discourse. A multi/trans/inter-disciplinary research approach for generating contemporary discourse acknowledges the inherent strengths of field specializations while capitalizing on the even greater strengths in their points of intersection.

Lindsay Burwell, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, was a faculty expert for the Finger Lakes Project sustainability curriculum development workshop. She presented a “From the Trenches” case study of how she incorporates “green chemistry” principles and practices into her chemistry courses.

Laura Campbell, Lecturer in Music, conducted the Wells College Chamber Orchestra and Jazz Band  for its year end concert on May 3 in Barler Recital Hall. Works performed included Beethoven’s Octet for winds, “O Fortuna” from Carmina Burana by Orff, the first movement of Mozart’s Fourth Horn Concerto featuring David Balcer ’20 on horn, and a medley from John Williams’ “Harry Potter.” The Jazz Band presented a spy themed concert featuring works primarily tied to famous spies, “James Bond Theme,” “Pink Panther,” “Mission Impossible,” “Peter Gunn,” with a couple of other standards included, “Birdland” and “Cantaloupe Island.”

Laura Campbell, as a member of Music’s Recreation, performed a world premiere of “Jorinda and Joringel,” composed by Tom Schneller and narrated by Camilla Schade in Ithaca, NY on April 2. This is a story from the Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales set to music with narration.

As a member of the professional flute ensemble, Finger Lakes Flutes, Laura Campbell performed in their Tenth Anniversary Concert in Ithaca, NY on April 30. Works specifically arranged and composed for the group over its ten year existence were the featured works.

 Laura Campbell also performed as the principal flutist in the Colgate Symphony Orchestraon their season ending concert on April 9 and as second flutist with the Orchestra of the Southern FingerLakes on their season ending concert on May 6.

Nancy Demerdash-Fatemi, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History, recently published a book review for H-AMCA (Association for Modern and Contemporary Art of the Arab World, Iran, and Turkey), called "Pluralism, Difference, Contestation and Tolerance: Sacred Spaces of Non-Muslim Communities in the Islamic World" (April 2017). In May, she received a Hamad bin Khalifa Travel Fellowship to attend a conference on "Islamic Art: Past, Present, and Future," at Virginia Commonwealth University in November 2017. Finally, in June 2017, she was promoted from Editorial Assistant to Assistant Editor for her involvement with the International Journal of Islamic Architecture.

Kent Klitgaard, Professor of Economics and Sustainability, was a faculty expert for the Finger Lakes Project sustainability curriculum development workshop. Kent presented “Thinking the Unthinkable”, a primer on what faculty interested in infusing sustainability into their curricula should know about the economic pillar of sustainability. He participated in a panel discussion of a cross-cutting sustainability issue, offering insights from his economics perspective.

Milene Morfei, Professor of Psychology and Sustainability, was a faculty expert for the Finger Lakes Project sustainability curriculum development workshop. Milene presented three sessions: the importance of place in sustainability education, what sustainability educators should know about within the social pillar of sustainability, and a “From the Trenches” case study of how she incorporates project-based learning in her Psychology of Environmental Sustainability class. Milene participated in a panel discussion of a cross-cutting sustainability issue, offering insights from her social science perspective.

 Jaclyn Schnurr, Professor of Biology and Environmental Science, was a faculty expert for the Finger Lakes Project sustainability curriculum development workshop. Jackie presented on “backward course design”, the course development method in which one first identifies the desired student learning outcomes for sustainability, then devises assessment methods to gauge student learning, and finally one develops the course activities and lessons to engage students in learning those desired educational outcomes.    

Wells College promises a relevant liberal arts and sciences education. Intellectually challenging. Reinterpreted for today. Classroom teaching combined with hands-on learning. Wells graduates enter the world prepared for successful futures.

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