Sociology and Anthropology

Anthropology and Sociology examine humanity from global systems to interpersonal interaction.
Catalog Requirements Notice

The requirements listed on these pages may change by the year as programs and courses are added or altered. Archived Academic Catalogs for previous years can be viewed in pdf form here. These documents contains the specific academic requirements pertaining to those who entered the College before the 2015-16 year.

Anthropology and Sociology examine humanity from global systems to inter-personal interaction. These sister disciplines help us to understand social structures and individual roles within them, the effects of colonialism on colonies and colonial powers, oppression and privilege, imperialism and self-determination and local responses to global conditions. The sociological imagination and the anthropological perspective together help us to understand how we both affect and are affected by the social and physical world around us. This major provides students with an understanding of the dynamics of culture, cultural survival, ethnicity, race, gender, class, sexuality, etc., and the foundations for conducting research so they will be able to participate in the creation of a more equitable and sustainable world.

Sociology and Anthropology Major

Professor E. Olson, Chair
The total number of courses required for the major is 15 (43-48 semester hours). At least six of the courses (18-19 semester hours) taken for the major must be at the 300-level or above.

REQUIRED COURSES

All of the following (22-24 sem. hrs.)

ANTH 161 Introduction to Anthropology (3 sem. hrs.)
MATH 151 Elementary Statistics (3 sem. hrs.)
SOC 151 Principles of Sociology (3 sem. hrs.)
SOCA 401 Senior Essay and Research Seminar in Sociology and Anthropology (4 sem. hrs.)

One Methods Course:
SOC 294 Research Methods for the Social Sciences (4 sem. hrs.)
or ANTH 260 Ethnographic Methods (4 sem. hrs.)

One Theory Course:
SOC 363 Sociological Theory (3 sem. hrs.)
or ANTH 330 Culture, Fieldwork, and Ethnography (3 sem. hrs.)

Experiential Learning: 2-4 credits from Experiential Learning opportunities.
These can either be internships with SOCA faculty acting as either on-site or faculty sponsors, or OCS J-term courses taught by SOCA faculty (i.e. OCS 300 Hawaii or OCS 305 Belize). A semester abroad would also meet this requirement. (2-4 sem. hrs.)

Four additional courses all under the SOC designation (CRIM 115 could count) or all under the ANTH designation (RELG 330 could count) and three courses in the other (21-24 sem. hrs.)

The SOCA faculty recommend (but do not require) taking one or more of the following courses outside of the major. Students should be aware that many of these courses have pre-requisites.

CREA 275 Creative Nonfiction (3 sem. hrs.)
ECON 209 Introduction to Political Economy (3 sem. hrs.)
ECON 255 The Political Economy of Globalization (3 sem. hrs.)
ECON 350 Economics of Developing Countries (3 sem. hrs.)
ENGL 380 Writing Literary Criticism: Methods and Theory (3 sem. hrs.)
ENVR 101L Introduction to Environmental Science (4 sem. hrs.)
FMS 101 Media and Power in American Culture (3 sem. hrs.)
HIST 372 Colonial Encounters (3 sem. hrs.)
FMS 281 Film and Literature (3 sem. hrs.)
INTL 151 Introduction to International Studies (3 sem. hrs.)
PHIL 235 Modern and Post-Modern Philosophy (3 sem. hrs.)
POLS 262 Politics of Developing Countries (3 sem. hrs.)
POLS 320 Liberalism and Its Critics (3 sem. hrs.)
PSY 235 Forensic Psychology (3 sem. hrs.)
PSY 250 Human Sexuality (3 sem. hrs.)
PSY 330 Indigenous Psychologies (3 sem. hrs.)
PSY 340 Psycholinguistics (3 sem. hrs.)
PSY 349 Cognition and Culture (3 sem. hrs.)
RELG 275 Religions of Asia (3 sem. hrs.)
RELG 330 Native Americans and the Environment (3 sem. hrs.)
SEJ 250 Introduction to Community Organizing (3 sem. hrs.)
THEA 320 Marginalized Voices: Women Playwrights (3 sem. hrs.)
WGS 245 Body Politics (3 sem. hrs.)
WGS 260 Indigenous Women's Experiences (3 sem. hrs.)
WGS 301 Feminist Theory (3 sem. hrs.)
WGS 310 Feminist Methodologies: Intersectionalities (3 sem. hrs.)

Anthropology Minor

Professor E. Olson, Coordinator

Anthropology is the study of humankind, which encompasses such topics as the origin and development of human society; the nature of human diversity in the past and present; ethnocentrism, world view and the roots of culture; and the differing ways in which peoples have adapted to environments and to other human groups.

Students majoring in sociology and anthropology may not minor in anthropology. The total number of courses required for the minor is 6 (18-19 semester hours).

REQUIRED COURSES

The following (3 sem. hrs.)

ANTH 161 Introduction to Anthropology (3 sem. hrs.)

One of the following (3-4 sem. hrs.)

ANTH 260 Ethnographic Methods (4 sem. hrs.)
ANTH 330 Culture, Fieldwork, and Ethnography (3 sem. hrs.)

Two courses from the following list from two different regions for a comparative perspective (6 sem. hrs.)

OCS 300 The Anthropological Experience in Hawaii (3 sem. hrs.)
OCS 305 The Anthropological Experience in Belize (3 sem. hrs.)
ANTH 250 Hawaii: Colonialism and Tourism (3 sem. hrs.)
ANTH 345 Maya Ethnography (3 sem. hrs.)

Two other ANTH designated courses (or RELG 330) (6 sem. hrs.)

Sociology Minor

Professor L. McClusky, Coordinator
The total number of courses required for the minor is 6 (18-19 semester hours).

REQUIRED COURSES

All of the following (18-19 sem. hrs.)

SOC 151 Principles of Sociology (3 sem. hrs.)
SOC 277 Social Inequality: Class and Ethnicity (3 sem. hrs.)
Either SOC 294 Research Methods for the Social Sciences (4 sem. hrs.)
or SOC 363 Sociological Theory (3 sem. hrs.)

Three more courses under the SOC designation (9 sem. hrs.)

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